|September 26, 2022

RAILWAY MUTTON CURRY: ORIGIN AND ITS HISTORY

Railway mutton curry, also known as first-class railway mutton curry, is a spicy Indian curry meal served in all "First Class" compartments on Indian trains. Mutton curry, also known as Kosha Mangsho Jhol and lamb curry, is a spicy Indian meal created with Mutton and vegetables. The railway mutton curry is a variation of the mutton dish popular during the British Raj colonial period.

History of Railway Mutton Curry

It is believed that the dish made its debut on the Frontier Mail (Golden Temple Mail) operated by the Western Railway in the years before independence. There are numerous familiar stories about the origins of railway mutton curry.

The story goes that a drunken British officer stumbled into the railway kitchen at midnight. The kitchen service had ended by that point, and the cooks were preparing supper for them. Calcutta Mangsho Jhol, or Bengali mutton curry, was a favorite meal for its fiery and spicy flavor. Because the British disliked the spicy flavor, the goat curry recipe was altered from spicy to delicate by adding coconut milk and yogurt. The officer liked it so much that he put it on the train's menu and named it the Railway Mutton Curry. The officer thought the mutton curry was beautiful, and it was served in the Indian Railways' First Class compartments from then on.

Bengali Mutton Curry - Mangshor Jhol

The second version retells the story through the eyes of an English army officer on a train. Whatever the story, Railway Mutton Curry is one of India's most popular non-veg curries. It's a milder variant of the traditional Bengali mutton keema recipe (Mangshor Jhol), made with coconut milk. It is served with plain rice or bread.

How to make Railway Lamb Curry

The First Class Railway Mutton Curry recipe is simple to prepare and delightful to eat. This curry mutton is generally made using English spices like pepper, bay leaves, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon, as well as Indian condiments like chilies, cumin, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garlic, and so on. During the British Raj, this Railway Mutton masala was prepared in the railway cafeteria and mainly served in the train's leisure rooms and first-class dining cars.

RAILWAY MUTTON CURRY: ORIGIN AND ITS HISTORY

Railway Mutton Curry is a mellower version of the spicy Indian Mutton Curry that was explicitly created for the upper class traveling in First Class compartments of Indian trains during the pre-independence era. But how to make it at home? 

Print Recipe

Ingredients

  • 300gm - Mutton or Goat/Lamb meat (Cut into medium pieces)
  • 4-5 - Onions (Finely chopped into long pieces)
  • 2-3 - Potatoes (Peeled and cut into medium pieces)
  • Garlic - (4-5 cloves)
  • Ginger (Finely chopped)
  • 1/2 tsp. - Dry roasted whole Cumin seeds, Coriander seeds
  • 1/2 tsp. - Turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp. - Fresh Curd 
  • Mustard oil
  • 5-6 - Whole Red Chilies 
  • Salt
  • Dry Garam Masala Spices 
  • 3 - Green Coriander Leaves

Instructions

  • To begin, place the Mutton in a mixing bowl and add the Curd. Add a tiny sprinkle of turmeric powder, one tablespoon of oil, and red chili powder, and let it sit for about 15 minutes to marinate.
  • Now to make a Garam Masala Paste, grind all the Dry Garam Masala Spices in a grinder along with whole Coriander and Cumin seeds. Grind them to a fine paste by adding little water.
  • While the Mutton is marinating, heat the stove and add the oil. When the oil is hot, add the Garam Masala paste. Allow them to cook and sizzle for a few minutes.
  • Add minced Ginger, diced Onion, and entire Garlic cloves to it. Fry it until it turns golden brown over medium heat. Continue stirring while you add whole red chilies and curry leaves.
  • Take the potatoes and marinated Mutton and place them in the cooker along with the other ingredients.
  • Give them about five minutes to cook before adding the potatoes. Set the flame to medium heat and allow it to simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Fifteen minutes later, add water to it. Then, cook it on high heat for 5 to 10 minutes. Remember to close the lid.
  • Turn off the heat and wait for the pressure to release after two or three whistles on high heat naturally.
  • Open the cover after the steam has been released, then top it with some fresh, green coriander leaves.

Serve alongside bread or rice. Serve green chilies and raw onion slices together for a tasty combo.

Final Words

Railway Mutton Curry or goat rogan josh is worth trying! It is easy to make at home, and for creating authentic mutton korma, you will need original ingredients, Spices with the original flavor, and natural oils; for this, you can check out the Alcoeats Easy Indie Bowls & Non-Vegetarian Masala for the best Gravy Mixes and Curry Masalas for an aromatic experience and grab some fantastic things for preparing your best mutton curries.

FAQs on Railway Mutton Curry Recipe

How to store Railway mutton Curry?

In an airtight container, Railway Mutton Curry is kept for two days in the refrigerator. Reheat it in a pan or the microwave just long enough to reheat the mutton pieces and the curry.

What to serve with Railway Mutton Curry?

This delectable mutton curry goes well with rice or other Indian bread like Jeera Rice, Phulka, Laccha Paratha, and Naan. It also pairs nicely with Burani Raita with Onions and lemon wedges.

Why is it called railway mutton curry?

As the name implies, Railway Mutton Curry Recipe is a dish that originated on the Indian Railways. This mutton masala is a milder variation of the fiery Indian Mutton Curry that was served in the first-class trains of the Indian Railways during the British Raj or before independence.

When was mutton curry invented?

Many believe that the Railway Mutton Curry, one of the first few foods served in Frontier Mail in the early 1900s, was a spin on the legendary Kolkata Mangsho Jhol (mutton curry).

Can we make this Railway Curry using Chicken?

Yes, you may make mutton curry with Chicken instead of Mutton. Use the same procedure, replacing the Mutton with Chicken. But remember that cooking chicken takes less time than cooking Mutton, so cook accordingly.

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