|December 22, 2022

OUR THANKSGIVING GRAVY CAN MAKE ALMOST ANYTHING TASTE AMAZING

The Gravy boat may not be seen very often on the ordinary dining room table, but you can expect it will be present at least once a year when your family and friends gather for Thanksgiving dinner.

A good gravy is more than just a turkey sauce. It unifies all of the Thanksgiving meal's elements and elevates the turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes to outstanding standards. You may prepare gravy the traditional way, whisking it together at the last minute with the savory drippings from the turkey pan, or you can make the gravy ahead of time and spike it afterward with the rich drippings.

How to make Thanksgiving Gravy?

The ideal sauce for Thanksgiving dinner is the traditional gravy you make from pan drippings right before placing all the food on your table. The deeply browned and rich scrapings from the bottom of the roasting pan may not appear to be much when you first remove the turkey from the oven, but those drippings are Thanksgiving nectar. It's also one of the simplest gravies to prepare. It takes around five minutes from roux to table and involves only a pan and a whisk. You don't even need a recipe for this. This step-by-step tutorial will show you how to create excellent Gravy to ladle over your mashed potatoes and turkey.

OUR THANKSGIVING GRAVY CAN MAKE ALMOST ANYTHING TASTE AMAZING

Our Thanksgiving or Turkey gravy makes a staple at every Thanksgiving table. This Festive gravy is easy to make and elevates the flavor of every element of your dinner feast.
Print Recipe
  • Cooking Time - 15 mins
  • Course - Side Dish
  • Cuisine - American
  • Servings - 6 People

Ingredients

  • Pan drippings from one 12- to 14-pound roast turkey
  • Roux from the turkey drippings
  • Two cups of low-sodium broth
  • Vegetable oil or butter, as needed
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

This gravy can be flavored with a splash of sherry, wine, or a teaspoon of minced herbs like rosemary, thyme, or sage.

Roux - Tips and Tricks

Roux is a fat-and-flour mixture that is boiled together and used to thicken everything from Gravy to béchamel sauce. Here are a few roux-making tips to help you make excellent gravy.

  • The standard roux ratio is equal parts fat to flour, which equals 3 ounces of roux thickening up to a quart of liquid.
  • Cook the roux until it smells nutty. Cook the flour until it has a cereal scent and appears dry.
  • A thick gravy can be thinned, while it is more difficult to thicken a thin sauce. To put it another way, start with less liquid than you think you'll need.
  • Roux-thickened gravies continue to thicken as they cool, so keep that in mind while serving.

Instructions

  • Collect the pan drippings- Set the roasting pan over medium-high heat on the stove after you remove the turkey from the oven and set it aside to rest. Pour in 1 cup of the broth and scrape up all the particles from the bottom of the pan when the pan drippings are hot and sputtering.
  • Place the pan drippings- in a liquid measuring cup and store them in the refrigerator or freezer. Refrigerate the fat and drippings. The fat and drippings will separate and harden in 30 minutes. It makes it easier to remove only the fat for the gravy.
  • Measure the fat- Scrape off the top of the fat once it has solidified, then measure it. Ideally, you should finish with around 1 cup of pan drippings and 1/4 cup of fat. If you don't have enough, you can make the difference with broth or oil/butter. If you have extra fat, discard some of it and use less broth in the next step. You can also double the recipe if you have a lot more.
  • Make a Roux- Heat the fat in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. When the fat is hot, add the flour and whisk to make a thin paste. Allow this to bubble for a few minutes.
  • Add the pan drippings- Whisk in the pan drippings to mix with the roux. It will result in a thick, gloppy paste.
  • Add in more broth- Whisk in 1/2 cup of the broth to finish the gravy. If you want a thinner gravy, add extra broth; if you want a thicker gravy, let it cook for a few minutes—season with salt, pepper, and any other seasonings to taste.

Final Words

For many people, turkey and all the fixings—or trimmings, depending on which side of the Mason-Dixon line you're from—would be an incomplete meal without a generous pouring of silky Gravy to moisten everything up. Nothing beats a hot drizzle of homemade mashed potatoes and turkey gravy cooked with meat juices to cap off your magnificent Thanksgiving feast. For all your gravy cravings, Alcoeats has brought you Easy Indie Bowl, the hub of gravy lovers. All your favorite dishes are made super easy with Alcoeats Instant Gravy Mix, which can cater to all your favorite recipes in minutes. It makes cooking easy and eating lovable. 

FAQs on Thanksgiving Gravy Recipe

What is traditional gravy made of?

Prepare the traditional thanksgiving gravy using a roux of meat drippings and flour. The broth is added to adjust the consistency, and black pepper and herb bits are added for flavor.

What does the flour do?

Gravy begins with a traditional roux: equal parts fat and flour are heated in a skillet until brown and bubbling. Without the flour, it will lack the desired thickness and texture.

What is the shelf life of gravy?

Because gravy is perishable, it will only keep in the refrigerator for two days. However, you can freeze leftover gravy in an airtight container or plastic bag for up to 3 months.

How can I make the gravy thicker?

Stir a couple of teaspoons of cornstarch into a small bowl of cold water until thick paste forms. Whisk a little into your gravy until it reaches the appropriate consistency.

Is it better to make gravy with stock or broth?

You can use either for gravy; however, it depends on the dish. If you're creating a chicken dish, use broth for the gravy. If you're starting beef or turkey meals, though, use stock.

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